Not for the first time we have to ask, “Who do Blue Labour think they’re kidding?” – reblogged from SKWAKWKBOX

March 24, 2018

by Martin Odoni

I was going to write an article about this myself but SKWAWKBOX got there first; –

Just after last year’s General Election, as ‘centrists’ and the Establishment reeled at Labour’s huge ‘surprise’ surge – though we and others said all along it would happen – the SKWAWKBOX pointed out six ‘desperation tactics‘ Labour insiders had predicted that the Labour right would use to try to undermine the Corbyn-led, continuing impetus toward government.

All six were duly used.

To learn what they are, click here.

6 desperation tactics

But there are several extra thoughts I need to add.

The big worry that occurs to me is that the centrist fanatics may have been conspiring with the Conservatives to set up the last two weeks of renewed infighting in the Labour Party. Think about the order of events; –

  • An opinion poll two weeks ago put Labour seven points up.
  • Two days later, the Tories hid information about the Salisbury Poisoning from Jeremy Corbyn prior to a debate of the matter in the House of Commons.
  • Corbyn asked reasonable questions about the matter as a result.
  • The Right of the Labour Party appears almost on stand-by to throw a public wobbler about him being ‘unpatriotic’ and a supporter of Putin.

 

A little like with the way the Chicken Coup was carried out two years ago, it all looks too neat and tidy not to have been orchestrated. Blue Labour has always been very fond of theatrics, and they always hope that the public are too naive to notice the implausible degree of ‘coincidence’.

With Corbyn rightly firing Owen Smith yesterday (whether you agree with Corbyn’s policy on Brexit or not, collective responsibility principles demand the Shadow Cabinet supports it, and Smith publicly opposed it), we are now getting more of the usual guff about Corbyn being a dictator; funny how in Blue Labour minds, Corbyn alternates between being too feeble to be a leader and being too iron-fisted (Schrödinger’s Labour leader once more). But Smith has no one to blame but himself. He knew Labour’s position on Brexit , and he probably realises how impractical a second referendum would be. When can we fit it in? What exactly happens if the vote rejects the final deal?

People think that centrists are, by definition, moderate in outlook, ergo less fanatical. But the Labour Right demonstrate that this assumption is nonsense. Just because their actual policy preferences tend to be the furthest from the extremes, it does not mean they are more tolerant or willing to compromise. On the contrary, their rejection of radical policies is so heavy-handed that it takes on an incredibly self-destructive form of fanaticism.

It is quite clear that Blue Labourites are terrified of the possibility of a Real Left Prime Minister, as it would prove their assumptions of the last thirty years have been completely wrong. Cognitive dissonance is an unpleasant sensation, and so they would rather hand the Tories another five years at Number 10 than accept that they made an enormous mistake moving to the right under Neil Kinnock, John Smith, and Tony Blair.

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10 Responses to “Not for the first time we have to ask, “Who do Blue Labour think they’re kidding?” – reblogged from SKWAKWKBOX”

  1. garydenness Says:

    And yet, despite the Great Corbyn victory of 2017, Theresa May is still in Number 10, the Labour Party is still brutally divided and the likelihood of a Corbyn government is less than rosy.

    From a union member who quit the Labour Party when Corbyn beat Smith, mostly due to his stance on Brexit, but also disillusioned with the cultish atmosphere that Corbyn and Momentum have brought into the party, despite generally liking the left wing policies. And not an isolated case. Which is a huge problem for Labour, and it’s a problem that is being exacerbated, not resolved.

    • Martin Odoni Says:

      So you like the policies and decided to leave?

      Okaaaaayyyy….

      • garydenness Says:

        Mostly due to his stance on Brexit. Did you read that bit okaaaaaayyyy?

      • Martin Odoni Says:

        Yes I did. I just think it’s rather weird that you left on the basis of ONE policy when you like so many others. I mean, how long were you in the party? Did you agree with Corbyn’s predecessors on absolutely everything? Because you’d have to have done for your actions to make sense.

      • garydenness Says:

        I mean, how long were you in the party?

        Long enough, but what difference does that make? None…

        Did you agree with Corbyn’s predecessors on absolutely everything?

        Of course not. But then it really depends on the significance of the disagreements…

        I just think it’s rather weird that you left on the basis of ONE policy when you like so many others.

        The problem is that this ONE policy, is Brexit. Which is the most consequential policy of this generation, and possibly (hopefully) my lifetime. I find it a bit weird that you trivialise it as ‘just ONE policy’, to be honest. And if it goes a bit wrong, then all Corbyn’s other grand policies will be drowned in a shitfest of debt and clerical overload. Even if it goes ‘ok-ish’, the task of completing Brexit is likely to dominate and overshadow all of Corbyn’s political goals.

        Corbyn supporters can claim he campaigned for remain all they like. I was watching. It’s polite to say his efforts were ‘half hearted’. Frankly, I was a little horrified. He lost my support, and his victory over Smith and the subsequent steering towards his own hard Brexit lost Labour my membership. The cultish takeover of the Labour party by Momentum is the icing on the cake.

        I vote Lib Dem now. Interestingly enough, I vote Lib Dem on the basis of ONE policy. Unlike many other Remainers, I wasn’t prepared to give any further benefit of the doubt in the last election. And that is where a lot of Labour’s increased vote came from. My suspicion is that, unless Keir Starmer manages to further influence Corbyn towards single market membership at a minimum, or a second referendum, Labour will lose more Remainers at the next election. Although it may well be too late by then.

      • Martin Odoni Says:

        “Long enough, but what difference does that make? None…”

        No I made very clear in the subsequent sentence why it makes a difference.

        “Of course not. But then it really depends on the significance of the disagreements…”

        So, for instance, you don’t consider going to war in Iraq for no good reason a sufficiently bad policy to change party?

        “I find it a bit weird that you trivialise it as ‘just ONE policy’, to be honest. And if it goes a bit wrong, then all Corbyn’s other grand policies will be drowned in a shitfest of debt and clerical overload. Even if it goes ‘ok-ish’, the task of completing Brexit is likely to dominate and overshadow all of Corbyn’s political goals.”

        But I’m not trivialising it. I’m simply pointing out that it is ONE policy, and I do not accept that policies like the War In Iraq were any less important.

        “Corbyn supporters can claim he campaigned for remain all they like. I was watching. It’s polite to say his efforts were ‘half hearted’.”

        He actually campaigned far more widely than any other Labour MP. He was the only Labour MP to take part in more than 100 pro-Remain events. That you didn’t notice reflects more on the media refusal to give him his fair share of coverage.

        “I vote Lib Dem now. Interestingly enough, I vote Lib Dem on the basis of ONE policy. Unlike many other Remainers, I wasn’t prepared to give any further benefit of the doubt in the last election”

        But you ARE prepared to give the benefit of the doubt to a party that stabbed its main support base in the back by helping the Tories increase tuition fees, and force through a widescale and completely unnecessary Austerity agenda? (Yes, I know the tuition fees policy, on closer examination, wasn’t as bad as it sounded at first, but it was still an explicit betrayal.)

        Yeah. Makes sense.

  2. johnpreid Says:

    Why do you keep saying Blue labour blue labour isn’t right wing, was formed as a backlash against new labour and certainly wasn’t part of the chicken coup, the likes Of Kate hoey and Maurice glasman didn’t support Owen smith and supported brexit

    • Martin Odoni Says:

      Er no. I’m not talking about that pressure group (which by the way, believes in social conservatism and largely rejects the Welfare State, putting it quite firmly on the right of the party). ‘Blue Labour’ in its original sense was a nickname given to Neil Kinnock’s reforms to the party, and included a notorious brief dalliance in the mid-1980s with a blue logo.

      The difficulty is that there are other shorthands, but they are also easily confused. For instance, I sometimes refer to the Labour Right as ‘Red Tories’ too, but then people think I mean liberal Conservatives like Ken Clarke.

  3. johnpreid Says:

    Do you even know what blue labour is ? https://mobile.twitter.com/blue_labour/status/977510034899980294 Fact is that momentum disagree with Corbyns view on supporting Brexit, and Corbynistas don’t twig that their middle class liberalsim,is more right wing than blue labour


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